Saturday, March 21, 2015

The Case For Geoff Johns as Showrunner of the DC Universe

Geoff Johns speaking on the Green Lantern panel at SDCC 2012. Credit: Blog of Oa.

By +Tim Beyers


Issue 17 of +The Full Bleed asks whether +DC Entertainment Chief Creative Officer Geoff Johns should be showrunner of the company's entire broadcast universe, keying off this analysis from my Scoop.it feed on The Business of Comics:


Notice that I'm not talking just about television but also live action and animated movies as well as video games, overseeing an interconnected narrative that informs, supports, and profits from each other -- but not for the purpose of creating continuity in the same way that Marvel has.

We already know DC isn't interested in straight-line continuity. Arrow and The Flash have created an interconnected TV universe that's about to be expanded by Supergirl. All three properties -- plus Gotham over at Fox and Constantine at NBC -- will stand apart from Zack Snyder's interconnected movie universe, which also stands apart from a (mostly) interconnected animated universe that borrows from some, but not all, of the video game properties.

Why have a cross-universe showrunner if cross-media continuity isn't an issue? To take advantage of opportunities.

Think of The Flash. On TV, Grant Gustin plays Barry Allen, The Flash of the Silver Age of comic books. Ezra Miller is due to play The Flash on the big screen. Will he also be Barry? He certainly doesn't need to be. Wally West held the title for decades in the comics. Bart Allen was The Flash at one point, too. So was Jay Garrick. A DC multiverse allows for all sorts of creative character development. Having Johns oversee it all would make it easier to surface the best stories in the best mediums, a deft business move that could delight both new and old.

Now it's your turn to weigh in. Would you like to see Warner and DC appoint Geoff Johns as its multiverse master? Leave your comment below or ping me on Google+, Facebook, or Twitter.

Or, subscribe to The Full Bleed and never miss an issue. You'll also get subscriber-only exclusives, including full access to the forthcoming DC Movie Report spreadsheet and others like it. Click here to get started now.

Wednesday, January 21, 2015

For Denver Comic-Con, These Are the Numbers to Beat

Denver Comic Con returns to the Colorado Convention Center May 23-25. Credit: Denver Comic Con.

By +Tim Beyers


Issue 16 of +The Full Bleed has new data from The Beat and Devastator on last year's comics conventions and festivals. Get the overview here and the full pdf here.

Take your time reading the report because there's a lot of great stuff within. My primary interest is in the results for my local, which is Denver Comic Con. According to the eight respondents who exhibited at least year's show:

  • 33% said sales were up. Half reported no year-over-year growth.
  • Average sales came in at $3,220, second only to San Diego Comic-Con. 2013's tally was just $2,100.
  • In terms of overall experience, DCC scored 3.4 last year versus 4.4 the year before and ranked 12th among national conventions. (The Toronto Comic Arts Festival scored best in this category.)

What can the Denver Comic Con organizers learn from the data? Probably nothing that they don't already know. Last year's event nearly ended with a showdown as exhibitors balked at planed charges for cart service to wheel boxes and other inventory into the Colorado Convention Center. Several stopped by the press area to complain with most promising not to return. The negative buzz ended only when DCC organizers backed away from many of the changes.

I'll be curious to see if any of the big exhibitors choose to stay away in 2015. Whether they do or not, I like DCC's chances of drawing well. Pop culture guests like Lindsay Wagner and Nichelle Nichols will appeal to the same crowd that came to to see Adam West and Burt Ward last year, when a record 86,500 attended.

Are you planning on going to this year's Denver Comic Con? Leave your comment below or ping me on Google+, Facebook, or Twitter.

Or, subscribe to The Full Bleed and never miss an issue. You'll also get subscriber-only exclusives, including full access to the Marvel Movie Report spreadsheet and others like it. Click here to get started now.

Thursday, January 15, 2015

"Arrow" and "The Flash" May Be Saving The CW, Too

Heat Wave teams up with Captain Cold in The Flash. Credit: Cate Cameron/The CW.




By +Tim Beyers 


Issue 15 of +The Full Bleed revisits May 2014, when a key affiliate expressed displeasure with The CW's programming strategy. 

The CW "should not program to [young] people who don’t watch television," Tribune Media chief Peter Liguori said at the time. Eight months later, The CW has re-upped Arrow and The Flash a month early.

For those who don't know, affiliates are station operators contracted to broadcast programming provided by studios. Tribune Media is The CW's largest affiliate. 

Don't expect to see Ligouri complaining now. Gina Rodriguez won a Golden Globe for her performance in the breakout hit Jane the Virgin while Arrow and The Flash have done well attracting young men with heaping helpings of delicious comic book action. 

Look at episode 108 of The Flash, "Flash vs. Arrow," which drew 4.34 million live plus same day viewers plus the night's top rating among men aged 18-34.

Further gains could be on the way. Next week's episode introduces the temperature twins on The Flash while Arrow prepares to introduce Brandon Routh as The Atom. All of it feeds a long-term business strategy that's just as good for Tribune as it is for The CW. I explain why in the video below. Click now to start watching.




Questions? Comments? Leave them below or ping me on Google+, Facebook, or Twitter.


And to keep up to date with all my coverage of the business of comics and genre entertainment, please consider subscribing to The Full Bleed. Getting started is as easy as entering your email address in the box to the left. Thanks for reading!

Saturday, January 10, 2015

UPDATE: "Guardians of the Galaxy" the Third Most Profitable Film in MCU History


By +Tim Beyers 


Issue 14 of +The Full Bleed updates the Marvel Movie Report, in which I break down the financials of each of the 10 films in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

Today's edition adds fresh numbers for Captain America: The Winter Soldier and Guardians of the Galaxy. Key takeaways:
  • GotG is now the third-most profitable film in the history of the MCU, trailing only Marvel's The Avengers and Iron Man 3.
  • Guardians' estimated 25.82% combined gross margin is materially better than the 20.90% put up by Winter Soldier. An extra $37.5 million in home video sales appears to be the cause.

Bookmark this post if you want to stay current with MCU financials. (The embedded spreadsheet updates automatically.) Thanks to Bruce Nash and his team at The-Numbers.com, whose tracking of home video sales made this update possible.

Questions? Comments? Leave them below or ping me on Google+, Facebook, or Twitter.

For direct access to the full Marvel Movie report and future reports like it, and to keep up to date with all my coverage of the business of comics and genre entertainment, please consider subscribing to The Full Bleed. Getting started is as easy as entering your email address in the box to the left. Thanks for reading!

Tuesday, December 9, 2014

Time to End the Cosplay Controversy: Some Data for Pat Broderick

By +Tim Beyers


Issue 13 of +The Full Bleed is dedicated to cosplayers. You who dress up to attend your favorite cons have taken a beating in recent months for reasons I still don't quite understand.

Commerce seems to be the issue. Fury of Firestorm artist Pat Broderick is the latest to make the argument, taking to Facebook on December 4:



Much as I love Broderick's work, the data says he's wrong on this issue. Details in the video, so watch now.



Want even more? Click here to read Zachary Clemente's open letter at The Beat, which inspired this post. I'd also highly recommend reading Rob Salkowitz's excellent post at Eventbrite, which has the data that refutes the "no value" argument plus a whole lot more.

That's The Full Bleed for today. If you like what you're reading here, please tell a friend. You can also write me an email or leave a comment below. I'd love to hear from you.

Monday, December 8, 2014

By The Numbers: What "The Flash" Has Done for "Arrow"

By +Tim Beyers


Welcome to issue 12 of +The Full Bleed, where I go between the panels to cover the business of comics, pop culture, and genre entertainment.

Last week, I looked at expectations for the big Flash vs. Arrow crossover and what it would take to set a new record. So how did each show do?

According to the live plus same day ratings provided by Nielsen and published at TVByTheNumbers, Arrow drew 3.92 million viewers -- not a record for the series but notable in that it's a 21% boost over the audience for episode 208, which fans will recall as the first appearance of Grant Gustin as police scientist Barry Allen. For The Flash, episode 108 drew 4.34 million viewers for the season's second-best draw so far.

Usually the gap is even wider. By my math, average viewership for Arrow is just under 2.8 million through eight episodes while The Flash has drawn less than 3.5 million viewers only twice since the show's October debut, a 700,000 viewer gap that could widen next week if the Reverse Flash proves to be more popular than Ra's al Ghul. I've embedded trailers for both upcoming episodes below. Enjoy, and be sure to leave a comment to let me know how you see these shows closing out the winter break.

Arrow - Episode 309: "The Climb"


The job of playing Ra's al Ghul passes from Liam Neeson's capable hands to that of Matt Nable. I've not looked up who gets to stand in for Professor Zoom but I also tend to avoid spoilers.

The Flash - Episode 109: "The Man in the Yellow Suit"


That's The Full Bleed for today. If you like what you're reading here, please tell a friend. You can also write me an email or leave a comment below. I'd love to hear from you.

Tuesday, December 2, 2014

Will Arrow vs. Flash Set New Ratings Records for The CW?
The early data may be encouraging, but both shows have set a high bar

Grant Gustin and Stephen Amell face off in a two-night crossover event. Credit: Cate Cameron/The CW

By +Tim Beyers 


Welcome to issue 11 of +The Full Bleed, where we go between the panels to cover the business of comics, pop culture, and genre entertainment.

Today's topic: "Arrow vs. Flash." Will the two-night crossover event be the draw The CW hopes? There are positive signs, to be sure. For example, the initial trailer has scored more than 268,000 YouTube views as of this writing, far more than the 50,000 to 70,000 that's typical for an episode preview for either show.

There's also social data to consider. Fans are taking to Twitter at an accelerating pace to join either "Team Arrow" or "Team Flash." Google Trends data isn't as optimistic, but at 45 out of 100 it isn't bad either. There's a chance this week's crossover draws record-setting ratings.

What might that look like? Close to five million viewers each, if the data is to be believed. According to Nielsen (via Wikipedia), Arrow notched 4.14 million live+same day viewers in its 2012 debut, still a series high. For its part, The Flash drew a network-record 4.83 million viewers in its Oct.7 premiere. I doubt we'll see either mark toppled this week, but I'd also love to be wrong.

Where do you stand? Head over to Google+ now to vote in the poll.

That's The Full Bleed for today. If you like what you're reading here, please tell a friend. You can also write me an email or leave a comment below. I'd love to hear from you.